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One of the overarching themes of American idealism through its existence has always been an inherent distrust of authority.

This distrust is a major reason that the Bill of Rights was ever created; to ensure that the new and fragile government would not usurp basic rights that American citizens had just fought a war to protect.

Especially considering recent events and scandals, the fear of the U.S. Government becoming tyrannical in nature is certainly a rational one, and one that many Americans share.

One of these Americans is Thomas Jefferson, who believed an armed rebellion “from time to time” is necessary to ensure freedom.

The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.

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Harsh treatment of Native Americans would not stop there.

After the Passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830, Andrew Jackson ordered the removal of Native Americans from the southeast United States, defying Chief Justice John Marshall who ruled that it was unconstitutional to do so.

John Marshall has made his decision; now let him enforce it! … Build a fire under them. When it gets hot enough, they’ll go.

This removal and “cleansing” was known as the Trail Of Tears.
Native Americans on the trail suffered from disease, starvation, and brutality. Death was very common and a significant portion of the Native American population was wiped out.

To quote a Georgian soldier aiding in the removal effort:

I fought through the War Between the States and have seen many men shot, but the Cherokee Removal was the cruelest work I ever knew.

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Time is illmatic.

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This is an awfully broad statement, although definitely applicable in some circumstances.

However, it should be noted that this is not always the case.

In a Psychology Today Article, Susan Biali M.D. argues:

You can only go so far on talent alone. If you’re good at something, it gets noticed and valued by others, and it certainly opens doors. It can generate much-needed income, which can be important. Yet when it comes to truly fulfilling your potential and knowing the joy of doing what you were made to do, the only thing that will give you that experience is what you love.

Biali also discusses how child prodigies are often forced into an activity that they do not enjoy; no matter how good they are, nothing can replace true passion (as was the case for Biali herself, as from an early age she was a gifted french horn player who absolutely despised playing the instrument).

Back to Cuban’s point, if you start out with an amount of passion or interest, becoming better at a specific activity/job/etc. can open doors to new opportunities and can make that activity even more enjoyable.

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Partially true.

On March 10, 2006, the Westboro Baptist Church picketed the funeral of Lance Corporal Matthew A. Snyder.

Originally the district courts ruled in favor of Synder’s family who sued the Phelps family for invasion of privacy and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

However, on March 8, 2010, the Supreme Court in an 8-1 decision ruled in favor of Phelps & the Westboro Baptist Church, citing the first amendment.
Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the majority opinion, stating:

“What Westboro said, in the whole context of how and where it chose to say it, is entitled to ‘special protection’ under the First Amendment and that protection cannot be overcome by a jury finding that the picketing was outrageous.”

The lone dissenter, Justice Samuel Alito, argued:

“Our profound national commitment to free and open debate is not a license for the vicious verbal assault that occurred in this case”

You can read the full dissenting opinion here.

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It should be noted that the Westboro Baptist Church has its own Twitter Page, Vine Page, and has participated in plethora of television specials/interviews.

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Westboro Baptist Church members are notorious (and perhaps most famous for) their controversial, explicit, and hateful signs used at their protests.

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While in practice this may be an exaggeration, in theory it is true.

The Hedonic Treadmill theory tells us that humans have a tendency to revert back to a certain state of happiness despite whatever big financial changes are occurring in our lives.

British psychologist Michael Eysenck developed the theory of the hedonic treadmill: that one must keep working to pursue happiness just to stay in the same place.

Thus, suddenly becoming rich will be exciting at first, but eventually one will get used to the lifestyle, begin to envision new hopes and desires, and fall back into a comfortable level of happiness (one that is similar to their happiness before the major positive financial change).

“Getting more money helps with happiness but only to a certain point. In the United States, that point is about $75,000 per year. At that point more money has diminishing returns on how happy it makes you."
-Michael Stevens

The above quote is from a somewhat unrelated video, although it does deal with money and happiness. It’s definitely something worth checking out nonetheless.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jf7Uo6nqaIg

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Unbeknownst to Brutus, he did not.

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Brutus is an honorable man.

Cassius and Brutus are good friends and partners in war, but this means absolutely nothing to Brutus when it comes to Rome and the preservation of his honor.

Basically, Cassius is angry at Brutus because Brutus ignored Cassius' request to “look the other way” as Lucius Pella accepted bribes. (Cassius and Lucius are friends).

Brutus goes ahead and condemns Lucius, as it is the honorable thing to do.

This event begins to deteriorate Brutus and Cassius' friendship. Although they do “make up” at the end of this argument, Cassius' realism clashes with Brutus' staunch idealism.

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"If one brick was removed the whole library was liable to ..." (F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (Chapter III)) | rejected

he is not old money, new money is what he truly is. the books are a way to try and fit in with the old money (he actually goes to the trouble to buy real books), but he never reads any of them.

"Has caused the deaths of thousands of Americans and Iraqis" (George W. Bush – Why Did George W. Bush Really Go to War (With Iraq)?) | accepted

Not to mention the enormous number of Iraqi Civilians killed.

"He's got his hand in his waistband. And he's a black male." (George Zimmerman – Transcript of George Zimmerman's Call to the Police) | pending

Not completely sure that saying he was black was completely unprompted. You’ll notice earlier that Zimmerman, when asked, said that Martin “looked black”, implying that he was not 100% positive. Zimmerman could have gotten a closer look at Martin at this point and was just giving the dispatcher the correct information. Also, if you listen to the tape, when Zimmerman says “he looks black” there is definitely some sort of hesitation in his voice, as if he is unsure. After Martin “comes after him”, Zimmerman tells the dispatcher a whole bunch of new, specific information which leads me to believe he is simply clarifying for the dispatcher. So basically, I would say what Zimmerman said about him being black was not as much an unprompted re-assertion, rather it was a clarification for the operator, but I guess thats up for you to decide :)

"But no one swooned backward on Gatsby, and no French bob ..." (F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (Chapter III)) | rejected

“for some reason” — I wonder what that could be :)

"James Madison Jr." (Constitutional Convention – The U.S. Constitution (Article 7)) | pending

"Alexander Hamilton" (Constitutional Convention – The U.S. Constitution (Article 7)) | accepted